Friday, November 11, 2005


Who is this man, and what does he do?

6 Comments:

Anonymous Daniel said...

A sage and a old school barber
who cuts hair and misconceptions.
This man is a slow speaking quick listener who gives jewels but owns none.

His father was a miner who died in the cold room of a rail station on the underbelly of a Utah city. His father was unable to afford the very coal that lay black roots in his lungs and so shivered his goodbyes, blue lipped, and worn like the potmarked leather of his empty wallet. He never knew his mother.

This man fought on foreign soil, loved many times, and never questioned his self-worth (he just never had time).

This man is both dangerous and gentle, a lot younger than he looks and his head is scarely shaped like a college regulation size football.

12:46 PM  
Anonymous Heath Casey said...

This is Joseph Yoakum. He is an artist. Most of his work is pen and colored pencil on paper. Most of his work is from the 60s and it is of nature landscapes. He lived from 1886-1772. He was a Navajo Indian. He actually worked many circuses growing up including Buffalo Bill and the Ringling Brothers. He served in World War I, as well.

He didn't start drawing until his 70s, where he claimed to have been told in a dream by the Lord to draw. He displayed them in front of his home to supplement his income.

Most of his work he claimed to draw from memory of the places he visited. This is not known to forsure.

check out www.rawvision.com/back/yoakum/yoakum.html

6:01 PM  
Anonymous lthompsonon said...

I think somebody missed the point of this exercise. The man's name is not Joseph Yoakum. He is known only as "Eggman McGribble", although there are a few records still in existence that suggest he might have been born "Ingmar Giblet". Since 1923, McGribble has worked for the USDA as a human reference point against which one out of every dozen eggs laid in the United States are measured. The eggs are tested for "3D, multi-surface parabolic and density uniformity", according to the USDA website. First, a group of over 10,000 low-level lasers are fired at McGribble's head and the data they gather are recorded in a "computer". Then the "computer" performs the same set of actions against the egg. Finally, the two sets of data are compared. If the egg does not match up to the standard that McGribble's head sets within a few significant digits, the egg is discarded.
In his free time, McGribble likes to surf eBay for Garfield collectibles.

10:09 AM  
Blogger masspew said...

Why is Luke wearing glasses?

10:28 PM  
Blogger masspew said...

just kidding, I know that guy. He touched me inappropriately last week in a gas station bathroom.

10:32 PM  
Blogger Andy Michael said...

No, that was Luke.

1:14 AM  

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